In the News

Sleep Apnea May Cause Nighttime Urination

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by David Freeman - HealthDay Reporter  | HealthDay

Many doctors unaware the sleep disorder boosts urine production, experts say

"When you ask people about symptoms like snoring and gasping, they tend to say, 'No, I don't have them'," said study author Edward Romero, research coordinator at the Sleep & Human Health Institute in Albuquerque, N.M. "But it's very easy for them to realize that they wake up at night to go to the bathroom."

SUNDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- People who wake up during the night to urinate shouldn't automatically blame a urological problem. Sleep apnea, a breathing-related sleep disorder, could be the cause.

A new study suggests that nighttime urination, or nocturia, is comparable to loud snoring as a marker for obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which soft tissue in the throat blocks the flow of air into the lungs, disrupting sleep.

Nightmare Scenario

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The New Yorker - On Nightmares
Can we learn to rewrite our bad dreams?
Dr. Krakow's pioneering research on nightmare treatment featured in the New Yorker Magazine.

Read the full article...

12 Tips to Avoid Daytime Sleepiness

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by Camille Peri | WebMD Feature
WebMD

Nearly everyone has days when they feel sleepy. But for some people, excessive sleepiness actually gets in the way of daily work, childcare, and even leisure activities. This is known as hypersomnia, recurrent sleepiness that makes people want to nap repeatedly, even at work.

Not surprisingly, the problem of daytime sleepiness usually starts at night. Even missing just a few nights’ sleep, or not getting enough uninterrupted sleep, can slow you down and sour your mood.

Poor sleep habits are often the cause of daytime sleepiness. Before you go through any more groggy and crabby days, try these 12 ways to improve nighttime sleep and avoid daytime sleepiness.


Doctors work to help those with PTSD get a better night's rest

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by Amanda Schoenberg | Albuquerque Journal

Susan Smith still feels sleepy most of the time.
The South Valley resident naps once or twice a day. She nods off at around 7 p.m. and then wakes up several times in the night. "I still am sleepy during the day," she says. "I get really drained. I'm like an old lady by the end of the day. But I am a lot better than I was."

Since July 2008 she has used a Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure device, or BiPap, that provides a steady air supply at night to control her sleep apnea. She also gets help with nightmares that have plagued her for years.